First ShimmyShim T-shirt designs

This week I designed and made up a couple of fashion doll T-shirts. This is the classic example, modelled by Barbie friend Deluxe Quick Curl Christie.

The slogan is “One of the Girls”.

Barbie Christie Deluxe Quick Curl wears ShimmyShim T-shirt

And this is a cap sleeve version on 80s Sindy.

Sindy wears ShimmyShim T-shirt cap sleeves

It’s made from one piece of cloth, which was an idea suggested by Ruth Gadsby, as a simple solution to avoid fiddly shoulder seams. On such a small scale, the fabric is strong enough to hold its shape on the shoulders, which creates something of a Star Trek look. I was quite excited about the style as I haven’t see one quite like it. For a human sized garment I wonder if you could create the same effect with something like neoprene fabric.

The first time I made up a T-shirt it went a bit skewiff, with the hem wavy and the sleeves (intended to be the classic shape) too wide.

Doll T-shirt first attempt with transfer

So, a few problems resolved with help and advice from Sindy collectors (thanks if any of you read this). I prevented the hems waving by placing a sheet of tissue paper under the fabric as I sewed it. This also gives you something to hold onto, so that you can manoeuvre the fabric left and right as it runs under the machine foot.

Machine sewing doll T-shirt side seams

The sleeves are impossible to sew in using the traditional method I learnt at school (make the sleeve into a tube and then slot it into the armhole). But manageable if you sew the open sleeve into the shoulder before the side seam is closed.

The stretch on the badly made sleeves had been caused by cutting the sleeve along the ‘wale’ of the weft knit jersey fabric, rather than across it, in line with the weft or ‘course’.

I tacked all the seams for my second attempt (tack a long way from the edge to avoid machining over the tacking). But for the third attempt, with speed in mind, I used pins to hold the seams together (pin at right angles to the seam and not too close). Only the very tight neck edge needed tacking. And I might try glueing that next time using a Prym Aqua Glue Marker (florescent when applied, dries clear and washes out).

Despite all my best efforts at speed I timed the making at over an hour with the press studs still to be sewn on!

iPhone stop watch display

Hopefully, to make these cost effective I’ll get faster with practice.

I ordered some Prym mini rivet press studs and started to experiment with them. They seem a bit tricky and the instructions aren’t clear. I crushed one set of studs because I’d used a wrong attachment (they’re not marked). Studs were skidding across the floor like meddlesome tiddly winks 😉 . I’ve put them aside for today as I’m not happy with the size either – 8mm is a touch too wide for a fashion doll T-shirt.

Image result for vintage tiddly winks

I’m currently working on the packaging for these T-shirts. Display cards are part of the whole experience of collecting and enjoying micro size fashion and I love them! Also, of course there must be a code number. 001 and 002?!

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